Author Topic: Pilot worth 1990 430cc  (Read 1238 times)

artoux

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Pilot worth 1990 430cc
« on: January 28, 2006, 09:22:00 PM »
Hello,
 My name is Chuck and I am new to this thread.  I've been looking for a Pilot. There is one that looks clean and is for sale for 8200 0b0,
 Looks clean and has a 430cc ported and polished motor and has 10 hrs. on rebuild. Pic looks clean.   I oferred him 7k is that too much.
  Considering you can get a rail for 8,000 or so.  which is faster.
  How much is this thing worth? Long travel suspension, plastic great shape, motor looks good. clean looking pilot.
  How much should I really offer him.  
 charles5095@sbcglobal.net

PilotHawK

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Pilot worth 1990 430cc
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2006, 10:36:17 PM »
If it has long travel at all 4 corners 10k isn't unreasonable, unless its really trahed. Get the best price you can though.

TOSKI

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Pilot worth 1990 430cc
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2006, 04:25:39 AM »
Is that pilot located in Wildomar CA?

Moskito

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Re: Pilot worth 1990 430cc
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2006, 07:35:14 AM »
Quote from: "artoux"
Hello,
 My name is Chuck and I am new to this thread.  I've been looking for a Pilot. There is one that looks clean and is for sale for 8200 0b0,
 Looks clean and has a 430cc ported and polished motor and has 10 hrs. on rebuild. Pic looks clean.   I oferred him 7k is that too much.
  Considering you can get a rail for 8,000 or so.  which is faster.
  How much is this thing worth? Long travel suspension, plastic great shape, motor looks good. clean looking pilot.
  How much should I really offer him.  
 charles5095@sbcglobal.net


Howdy Chuck.

The 430 cc displacement may be an issue.  If it's an ATV Racing setup, you can no longer get the piston that fits that jug.  (look for a spacer under the cylinder) - that limits what you can do with the engine when it's time for a rebuild (all two strokes need to be rebuilt every now and then - they wear out eventually)   10 hours on the rebuild means it's still fresh, though.

If you do decide to get this Pilot, go out and order a stock jug as soon as you get the Pilot.  Get a stock piston and ring set and all the gaskets too - that way you will have the parts you need when it comes time to work on it.  The stuff's getting harder to come by at times (back order issues), so having it on the shelf and ready to go can save you days, if not weeks, of wait time.  A couple hundred bucks well worth spending up front, if you can swing it.

Okay, don't take offense to the next paragraph - it's not intended to get anyone's shorts in a knot, just change the direction of thinking about things:

The dreaded "which is faster" comment - I love this...
First off, how often do you (and where?) drive a vehicle at top speed all the time.  Most of us only top out our vehicles about 1-2% of actual driving time.  I AVERAGE about 57-60 mph during a desert race - I MIGHT hit top end twice per lap - which, with the last setup was just at 90 mph. (this is not in a Pilot, by the way)

The question should be "which one is more drivable", or, "which one is quicker".  Top end's a lame thing to pin as a which is better.

The Pilot will walk all over a regular rail - they're light, have great hp to weight ratio, handle well and are a blast to drive.  No shifting, dealing with turn brakes and such.  Just point and shoot.  Work the wheel, throttle and brakes and you're driving.  Learn a few brake/throttle/weight transferring techniques and you're hauling arse.

A well built Pilot, running 24" tall tires, a NEW belt with proper clutch tuning will run right around 68-71 mph.  Stockers run 55 or so.  It's all a function of engine RPM once the clutches get fully upshifted.  A built engine will turn 7800 rpm, a stocker has the rev limiter kick in somewhere around 6500 - 6800 rpm (as I recall).  Trust me - 70 in a Pilot's fast enough... Shit happens quickly.

A long travel Pilot with engine work will spank most four wheel vehicles (that you sit in - not quads).  But, with that said, don't go out thinking you're King of The Area - there's ALWAYS something faster/handles better/works better lurking around the corner.  Always....

If the Pilot you're looking at is an ATV Racing done long travel car, is clean and has a lot of the options they sell, then offering 9K is probably a good price to pay.  But you may as well low-ball and see where the owner goes from there.  If it's clean and works, then the 8200 may be a steal.
Moskito - Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming \'WOW-What a Ride!\'

dhjunkie

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Pilot worth 1990 430cc
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2006, 09:23:38 PM »
Quote from: "Moskito"
A well built Pilot, running 24" tall tires, a NEW belt with proper clutch tuning will run right around 68-71 mph. Stockers run 55 or so. It's all a function of engine RPM once the clutches get fully upshifted. A built engine will turn 7800 rpm, a stocker has the rev limiter kick in somewhere around 6500 - 6800 rpm (as I recall). Trust me - 70 in a Pilot's fast enough... Shit happens quickly.



OH SURE, now you say this  :)  

dirt, sky, dirt !!!!!!!