Author Topic: Street legal Pilots anyone?  (Read 10213 times)

still_kickin

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Street legal Pilots anyone?
« on: May 12, 2012, 12:17:09 PM »
Does anyone have a street legal one?

Louisiana DMV was asking me for an odometer, Inspection sticker and turn signals.

Searched for odometer but no results seen.

Never had to get an inspection sticker on a two stroke. Any advise?


KTM265

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2012, 08:39:09 PM »
Drop some coin for a Trail Tech Voyger...speedometer, engine water temp and GPS...LOL
You only need two tools in life -- WD-40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and should, use the WD-40. If it shouldn't move and does, use the duct tape.

Hoser [həʊzə] n 1. US slang a person who swindles or deceives others 2. Canadian slang an unsophisticated, esp rural, person

Factory 45

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2012, 06:36:24 AM »
Pilot on the street? Seems like it would have to be a CAR basically. NY you can get away with riding it on the road with an AGRI triangle on the back...

My honest opinion...dont waste your time...you are gonna have to REV the crap out of it ALL THE TIME and it wont last. Do it if you wanna kill it...and just to look cool and be the talk of the town for a day or two. You will have to bring a mixing setup to do your fuel at the pump EVERY TIME. You just wont be in a good enough seating position to see traffic safely at intersections.

I have been looking for loop holes for a while for putting a QUAD on the street but it simply puts 1 too many wheels on the ground.

The trans FNR has alot of NEVER GONNA FIND EM STUFF in it. Street riding tears up off road trans gears...have built a few Supermoto bikes and a Recluse auto clutch is almost standard to reduce drive torque. The rear axle is not limited slip...and you think it pushes while cornering off road ?!?! WAIT till you put it on a dry street...
« Last Edit: May 13, 2012, 06:47:36 AM by Factory 45 »

KTM265

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2012, 08:24:32 PM »
Before we get too crazy with advice...are you planning to keeping it mostly stock or we talking some major modifications?
You only need two tools in life -- WD-40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and should, use the WD-40. If it shouldn't move and does, use the duct tape.

Hoser [həʊzə] n 1. US slang a person who swindles or deceives others 2. Canadian slang an unsophisticated, esp rural, person

Factory 45

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2012, 02:56:08 AM »
Sorry if that was a lil harsh...but I have wanted a 4 wheeled OHRV of sorts for the road for a long time. MOST states will only allow motorcycle compliances to have 3 wheels (which is why Can Am spiders and Terex only have 3) otherwise you end up in the Car/Truck bracket. This is when you start talking Emission and Safety restraints...which brings into play crash testing and ride height etc. Pilot will never comply for DOT road usages as a vehicle.

Certain states by me like PA and NY have alot of Amish and Agricultural exemptions...in other words the farm equipment and horse drawn buggies need NOT be officially registered. Just display a bright orange reflective triangle...for safety. No Lights or signals are OFFICIALLY required...and a State inspection is also not required. They are allowed on the road...and some of my buddies have Rhinos they blast into town with.

If you have a quick trip kind of intention with this...it might fly. But I just could not see turning a Pilot into a full time mode of transpotation. Take a look into Louisiana's Farm and Agricultural chapter within the DMV law...see if you can find a loop hole somewhere.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2012, 03:00:18 AM by Factory 45 »

LiveWire

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2012, 06:10:16 AM »
Michigan seems pretty easy to get a sand rail plated so I figured it could be done to an Odyssey or Pilot. An advantage is if plated, I can park my truck and trailer at the state owned parking lot up the road from Silver Lake and get a dune ready pass to drive from there to the park. Someone recently told me that he looked into it and that a locked rear end is not allowed.

still_kickin

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2012, 04:28:59 PM »
Drop some coin for a Trail Tech Voyger...speedometer, engine water temp and GPS...LOL

I need an odometer.
Engine temp and other values may be nice to have (not racing yet, in the future maybe) but won't they need sensors?

still_kickin

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2012, 04:39:37 PM »
My honest opinion...dont waste your time...you are gonna have to REV the crap out of it ALL THE TIME and it wont last. Do it if you wanna kill it...and just to look cool and be the talk of the town for a day or two. You will have to bring a mixing setup to do your fuel at the pump EVERY TIME. You just wont be in a good enough seating position to see traffic safely at intersections.
...
The trans FNR has alot of NEVER GONNA FIND EM STUFF in it. Street riding tears up off road trans gears...have built a few Supermoto bikes and a Recluse auto clutch is almost standard to reduce drive torque. The rear axle is not limited slip...and you think it pushes while cornering off road ?!?! WAIT till you put it on a dry street...

I'm in a wheelchair so it is hard for me to get the 600lb beast on the trailer and strap it in. Id like to be able to just drive it to the neighboring fields, have some fun and get back on my own.


Gassing up is not a problem, I can just keep a quart or 1/2 stashed somewhere.

I did not expect running it on the street will cause more wear on tranny and gears...Am I not supposed to run it WOT? On or Off road, will that cause problems? Could y'all elaborate some more on this please.

Yes, in the week I've been using it, I feel that push. Am still learning to incorporate it in safe driving practice. One thing I realized, throttle should be used gently while turning. That keeps some weight on the front wheels and gives a little more traction. Now power sliding is different technique and one which will take me a while to learn.



KTM265

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2012, 05:14:41 PM »
Weight balance is an issue, these are front end lite in my opinion.  If you look at my thread going about my build, you'll see I had my front end completely re-designed and we are shifting weight to the front.  Later this week we hope to test our new design.  I went to pick up my new tie-rods today and they only had one done and it wasn't correct.  They made it the right length and threads were good but it was the same diameter as the stock.  As most of you who drive these things long enough know, it's just a matter of time before you have one bent like a horse shoe...I designed a tie-rod that moved the bend poing out to the end of the tie-rod so if you do bend one, the deflection of the wheel is minimal...plus I used a lot stronger material.

Anyway...point being there are ways to correct the push, technology has changed a lot since these first came out.  Quote from Burt Rutan, designer of the Voyager airplane that flew around the world non stop..."If you can dream it, you can build it".   Pound that keyboard and ask us questions, find a good fab shop and post alot of pictures and results...some may work, some may fail but who cares if you're having fun. 
You only need two tools in life -- WD-40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and should, use the WD-40. If it shouldn't move and does, use the duct tape.

Hoser [həʊzə] n 1. US slang a person who swindles or deceives others 2. Canadian slang an unsophisticated, esp rural, person

KTM265

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2012, 05:16:26 PM »
Drop some coin for a Trail Tech Voyger...speedometer, engine water temp and GPS...LOL

I need an odometer.
Engine temp and other values may be nice to have (not racing yet, in the future maybe) but won't they need sensors?

Has an odometer, hour meter...etc...everything you'll need plus more for down the road.
You only need two tools in life -- WD-40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and should, use the WD-40. If it shouldn't move and does, use the duct tape.

Hoser [həʊzə] n 1. US slang a person who swindles or deceives others 2. Canadian slang an unsophisticated, esp rural, person

still_kickin

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2012, 06:08:27 PM »
Drop some coin for a Trail Tech Voyger...speedometer, engine water temp and GPS...LOL

I need an odometer.
Engine temp and other values may be nice to have (not racing yet, in the future maybe) but won't they need sensors?

Has an odometer, hour meter...etc...everything you'll need plus more for down the road.

I see these. http://www.trailtech.net/912-4010.html
and some other models as well. Nothing for the Pilot. this look s like another project if parts and sensors need to be modded.

still_kickin

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2012, 06:18:53 PM »
Weight balance is an issue, these are front end lite in my opinion.  If you look at my thread going about my build, you'll see I had my front end completely re-designed and we are shifting weight to the front.  Later this week we hope to test our new design.  I went to pick up my new tie-rods today and they only had one done and it wasn't correct.  They made it the right length and threads were good but it was the same diameter as the stock.  As most of you who drive these things long enough know, it's just a matter of time before you have one bent like a horse shoe...I designed a tie-rod that moved the bend poing out to the end of the tie-rod so if you do bend one, the deflection of the wheel is minimal...plus I used a lot stronger material.

Anyway...point being there are ways to correct the push, technology has changed a lot since these first came out.  Quote from Burt Rutan, designer of the Voyager airplane that flew around the world non stop..."If you can dream it, you can build it".   Pound that keyboard and ask us questions, find a good fab shop and post alot of pictures and results...some may work, some may fail but who cares if you're having fun.
I think this is more machine than I can handle. like I read somewhere, "learn the limits of the thing stock, then any changes will be more appreciated." Take my time with it is exactly what I plan to do.

While modding the front end to improve steering would be appreciated, I have neither the funds, nor the skills.
I might just end up with some ballasts in the front foot well! Lol I'll try it out.

How does wheel offset affect steering? What's this I keep reading about bump steer???

odypilots

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2012, 06:34:28 PM »

While modding the front end to improve steering would be appreciated, I have neither the funds, nor the skills.
I might just end up with some ballasts in the front foot well! Lol I'll try it out.

How does wheel offset affect steering? What's this I keep reading about bump steer???

Wheel offset does affect the steering to some degree. Stock front wheels are highly sought after by some that really value the steering feel they provide.

Tires are very important to how a Pilot turns, although my experience is off road, not on. Ballast is easy to try.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2012, 06:41:55 PM by odypilots »
The usual 'my two cents' disclaimer applies. :)

Factory 45

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2012, 05:25:49 AM »
Bump steer is present in just about every front end. (take the shock out and see on any machine) As you take the suspension and go from droop to compressed you will note a slight change in toe (steering angle) from bottom to top. This is what the term bump steer means. It all has to do with the suspension arc vs tie rod length...very difficult to eliminate all of the bump steer from some front ends.

Pilot searching will bring you to many "bump steer kits" or "anti bump kits" these serve 2 purposes. 1) Changes the span of the tie rod by giving it 2 seperate pivoting idler arms (like the front end on an S-10) giving the rods less length changes across the arc. 2) When upfitting a pilot with more than stock travel the rods simply HIT THE FRAME because they are too long...the 2 idlers change the mounting points for both inner rod ends...creating a "center link" type of steering and drastically changing the rod length.

Motion of the suspension is relevant to the a arm length...the tie rods for the steering being longer makes the change in length across the arc different than the a arms. Having a shorter tie rod (closer to the actual a arm length) makes your steering turn less over bumps...thus reducing "bump steer".

Wheel offset has an effect on how much force is used and is given back to and from the spindle while it turns under load. Draw an imaginary line...or try to imagine a straight king pin thru the upper and lower ball joint. The OPTIMUM setup for wheel offset is to have the center of the pivot axis (imaginary line) be centered into the wheel (right in the middle of the rim and tire) so the footprint is even at the point it pivots to steer on. OTHERWISE static is the result...meaning extra leverage from the wheel hanging over that pivoting point. This can be bad...but not terrible. Addition of a steering stabilizer will help you keep a firm grip on the wheel...because static can be a bitch when you slam a stationary object (like a small hole or rock) while moving out down a trail.

It is VERY difficult to correct ALL Pilots front end issues...keep it stock and learn how to pitch it with the brakes and POSI-TRAC rear end. They push pretty hard but we all have learned to deal with it to an extent...guys can wrap up alot of money on just the front end...but ask Hoodlum...we put a whoppin on 2 RZR 900 XP's with all the mods money can buy...and MY Pilot is on a STOCK set of arms with HUGE offset and NO stabilizer. :)
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012, 06:24:06 AM by Factory 45 »

LiveWire

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Re: Street legal Pilots anyone?
« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2012, 01:53:10 PM »
One of the biggest factors not addressed by most is Ackermann angle. The inside tire needs to turn sharper than the outside wheel by the correct amount in order for all wheels to be on the correct arc around the pivot point the machine is turning around. A stock Pilot does not turn the inside wheel enough. I changed that by moving the mounting points of the tie rod ends in where they connect to the knuckle.