Author Topic: Hey all, total noob here with some tech questions/ pic ?s  (Read 1974 times)

vreihenmotor6

  • Guest
Hey all, total noob here with some tech questions/ pic ?s
« on: November 08, 2004, 10:00:17 AM »
hey, I've never even seen an pilot up close but I have a feeling that it could very helpfull to me in my creation of this:



I'm very interesed to see the steering linkage on the pilot
currently we use a handle bar but we are considering a butterfly wheel for this years car

also I'm very interested in the drivetrain setup on the pilot
the onlu think I'm sure of it that it uses a cvt
does it have a mulit speed gear box?
or is it a F-N-R box?
does the pilot use a diff?, or an lsd, or is it a spool?

thanks a lot
sorry about all the questions

vreihenmotor6

  • Guest
Hey all, total noob here with some tech questions/ pic ?s
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2004, 10:25:50 AM »
okay, I got a downloadable manual and I answered some of my questions

as far as I can figure out the tierods go all the way to the center of the car
are there bump steer issues with that?
I know that with the currentt car the difference between the a arm lenght and tie rod lenth created some nasty bump steer for us

and what is the torque limiter?
is it a device to limit drive train stock after landing a rough jump?

Moskito

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 396
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.yellowdogracing.com
Hey all, total noob here with some tech questions/ pic ?s
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2004, 11:40:50 AM »
if you want some pix of a bump steer setup, check my web pages on one of my projects:  http://www.yellowdogracing.com/fs.htm

The stock Pilot suspension does suffer from bump steer - especially when you start long traveling it.  ATV Racing makes a bump steer kit that eliminates the majority of the problem.
Moskito - Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming \'WOW-What a Ride!\'

vreihenmotor6

  • Guest
Hey all, total noob here with some tech questions/ pic ?s
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2004, 04:17:23 PM »
cool
looks nice
thank for the link :!:

am I to assume that moving the pivots of the tie rods further outward brings them closer to the piviot location for the suspension arms thus reducing the differential in length change as the suspension moves upward?

Moskito

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 396
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.yellowdogracing.com
Hey all, total noob here with some tech questions/ pic ?s
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2004, 06:37:50 PM »
Quote from: "vreihenmotor6"
cool
looks nice
thank for the link :!:

am I to assume that moving the pivots of the tie rods further outward brings them closer to the piviot location for the suspension arms thus reducing the differential in length change as the suspension moves upward?


WOW!!!  Your the very first person to ever put it in those terms.  They are SPOT ON!

All boils down to the difference in the length (distance between) of all the pivot points.   If you can get the tie rods to be the same length as AND parallel to the a-arms, then you have no bump steer issues.  Much easier said than done.

Here's some more crap to read: http://www.yellowdogracing.com/setup.htm
Moskito - Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming \'WOW-What a Ride!\'

vreihenmotor6

  • Guest
Hey all, total noob here with some tech questions/ pic ?s
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2004, 07:14:30 PM »
well, thanks
I've kinda known the basics of suspension for a while
but since we have to design and fabricate the entire car from the ground up I've found that the real world applications are very difficult to get right
I've also been very fusterated trying to find exact specs on any ATV parts
because the manufacturers seem not to think that anyone will need them

my current area of focus is drivetrain (maiking a custom 3 speed to work with a comet 790 ctv, drive line components (finding some nice cv joints), and suspension geometery
all in hopes of making the new car better/ faster/ easier on the driver

LiveWire

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1025
  • Karma: 20
    • View Profile
    • 85 Honda Odyssey FL350 Parts
Bump steer
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2004, 06:51:37 AM »
The tie rods aren't exactly parallel to the A-arms because the A-arms are not parallel to each other (on a Pilot and should not be for good handling). The angle of the tie rod is a weighted average of the angle of the upper and lower A-arm. If the lower A-arm is at 40 degrees , the upper A-arm is at 30 and the tie rod is half way between, then the tie rod should be at 35 degrees. If the A-arms were say 10 inches apart at the knuckle, 5 inches apart at the frame and the tie rod connects to the knuckle 2 inches above the lower ball joint, the inner tie rod end should be 1 inch above the inner pivot point of the lower A-arm. The same goes for the length, it is a weighted average of the length of the upper and lower arm.

When I say angle of the A-arm, I am not referring to the angle of the tubes that make up the arm, but rather the angle measured from the pivot point to the ball joint. The Pilot like most vehicles has the ball joints angled to the tubes of the arms to take advantage of all the mis-alignment angle of the ball joints. This gives the appearance that the A-arm is at more of an angle than it really is.